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IX Diva Challenge #88 - the good, the bad, the ugly

Firstly, I have to say thank you so much to everyone who has left a comment on my blog, or emailled me, over the last day or so. The interest in my Scroll Feather pattern, and drawings, has been overwhelming. I really appreciate that you took the time to leave me a message :) Also, thank you to Linda for including my pattern, and the wonderful work that she does with her Tangle Patterns website - this fantastic resource has been my bible. Now, this weeks Diva Challenge. I have to say, IX was a little hard for me to see initially how it would work with my style of drawing, and, when it was launched, I sketched it in my pattern log, then pretty much ignored it. Poor little IX. This is what I LOVE about the challenges, they make me step outside my comfort zone and try to make a pattern work for me. So, the GOOD: I love that elements of the design become "embedded" as in Auraknot, and that it lends itself to organic flowing designs. The BAD: I am shockingly bad at drawing evenly spaced parellel lines. I think I lose concentration half way along the line and just start thinking about, I don't know, maybe feeding my cats. LOL. Or, I continue even when I know my hand is contorted way past what is normal and it spasms. I'm like the little engine.....I think I can, I think I can.....well, I can't! The UGLY: for me, the end caps on IX just don't work in my drawings, they just feel too clunky for me - so, the challenge for me was how to overcome this - here's what I came up with: Motto 1 - "when all else fails, draw a daisy", I've extolled the virtue of the daisy many times, LOVE THEM, so yah, I drew 'em again. Here's my IX daisies, you can see I capped the ends without creating the extra lines (though I did try it out on one end).
Motto 2 - "fall back on the scroll", said in a trance like voice. No capping at all on the pattern here.
Motto 3 - "make it into a ball". Another ploy that I use when I don't really know what to do with a pattern, is to work it into a ball shape. I actually think IX works brilliantly with this and would use it again, shading the ouside edges to make it appear more rounded. It also solves the capping problem for me as the pattern appears to continue over the ball edge. **I have edited this photo to show approximately the actual size of the ball, which is approximately 5cm, or 2". The larger image blows out the lines and shows all the imperfections :)
A 5 minute drawing I did last to experiment with using alternative end shapes, rather than a triangle, on the first line of the pattern - I think tear drops, smaller circles and boxes would also work well. Maybe another time when I'm up for more experimentation.
If you are still with me, brilliant! It's a bit of a long one, and hopefully you are still awake :) Thought you might like to check out my IX brainstorming page. All of the above ideas had their genesis in this page - I don't do this for all challenges, but on the ones where I really don't know how I am going to approach it, I do a bit of free drawing, not really thinking about what I'm doing and just seeing where it takes me.
hx

Comments

  1. WOW, they are all fantastic. You have made a good job of making the IX design really fine and delicate and still capped with a daisy!!!

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  2. Magic! Whacky doo Helen you are a whizz! I love your experiments!

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  3. Helen, these are amazing! I thought I was in love with your mandala until I saw your circular IX knot. I think I should have done a "brainstorming page". Good idea.

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  4. I knew they were going to be spectacular! I love how you celebrated the bold and the delicate! Really wonderful!

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  5. Helen, I agree with al lot of things you mention (concentration long lines, coming out of the comfort zone etc). But your work is still amazing. I love the one with the mooka and the one with the circle endings. The one on the ball I love to, but I have to be honest. When someone would show me all these pieces, and would ask me wich ones where from your hand, than I certainly not choose the one on the ball. I would not recognize it as your style. The others with such a delicate way of drawing I certainly would recognize as your work. I love it!

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    1. Thank you! These challenges always surprise how much I enjoy working with patterns that I haven't really liked at first introduction. It's funny, everytime I look at that ball I see the wonky, magnified lines, I have edited the image to show the actual size of the ball :)

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  6. Amazing what you can do with this tangle!

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  7. Lovely! And what a difference between 1 + 2 and 4 + 5; first two so delicate and last ones so bold. I do agree with Didisch, that only in the first two you recognize your style.

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  8. Thank you so much for sharing how to do this tangle "lightly." I really like your brainstorming page too!

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  9. I can't believe your imagination! These are all so awesome. You have inspired me yet again. I have no doubt that you will continue to do so.

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  10. I love your tangles, as always. The version with the circular ends is just awesome. Thanks for the great experimentations!

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  11. Love your thought process.... your motto's are great and I may have to use some of these (hope you don't mind) - I especially love "make it into a ball" :)... My absolute fav. is the one with the IX going through the IX with circles - brilliant!

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    1. Thanks, Sue. Go for it! For some reason making patterns into a ball or circular shape seems to work for me, also gives me a chance to play with perspective, etc, if I want to - I didn't on this one, but with a bit of playing with the initial line direction, shading, I think it would work :)

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  12. Love, love, love all of your work. I'm with your motto ' if all else fails, add a daisy" only I would make it ANY flower-like shape. The one going thru the circle is genius although I prefer your lite delicate style most.

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  13. helen - i really don't like this IX pattern at all - and i was in that class! i just can't get it to look right, or even close to acceptable. i like your brain-storming page, maybe i could try something like that. i like what YOU did with IX, though - your sweeping, flowing lines are always beautiful. and i really like that last one with the circles - that's an awesome IX right there :)

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  14. Congrats congrats congrats on having your pattern included on Tangle Patterns! I was so excited to see it and am sure that you'll have more on there soon (I hope so, anyway, since I LOVE your tangles!!) Your IX is wonderful--you took (in my opinion) a clunky, heavy pattern and made it beautiful and flowing and inspired me to give it a shot! Beautiful work as always and I totally love reading about your process! Thanks for sharing with us!

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    1. Thank you, Dawn :) It was very exciting for me, too! I enjoyed working with IX for the challenge, but I don't think it'll ever be a go-to pattern for me - those ends......uuggh!

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  15. Thank you from me too! I love the way you turned this into your own, and your explanations of your thought processes was so helpful! Although "innate talent" cannot be learned, I believe that "creative thinking" can be developed. Your explanations helped me move out of my, rather rigid, follow-the-directions way of thinking about the art of drawing zentangles and into thinking about the patterns in a new way.

    I will have to admit to being rather glad to see that even one who can draw so well has problems with long parallel lines! Mine are very wonky and I despair of ever being able to get them even! After lots of frustrating practice they are getting slightly better - but parallel curved lines.....forget about it (at least for another year's worth of practice!

    Jakki

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    1. Thanks, Jakki! I'm a big believer in practice and understanding the process. I didn't think I could draw until I was about 25, I did some classes and it just clicked for me. Up until you'd be lucky to see me draw a stick figure that looked like it was supposed to :)

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  16. These are all fantastic, but I love the way that you can always make patterns look so delicate, my favourite is the IX/Mooka/scroll one.

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  17. I looove how you made this tangle your own. I struggle with this one too. I really like how you worked within the circle. Also, as usual, all your drawings ROCK.

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